Sci-Fi

Ghost in the Shell (2017)

Ghost in the Shell (2017)

Director:

Rupert Sanders

Starring:

Scarlett Johansson

Pilou Asbaek

Takeshi Kitano

Plot:

In the near future, Major is the first of her kind: A human saved from a terrible crash, who is cyber-enhanced to be a perfect soldier devoted to stopping the world’s most dangerous criminals.

Review:

I’m unfamiliar with the source material for this movie, but just watching the trailers made it seem interesting. It’s Sci-fi starring a female lead, so definitely something I’m interested in. Sadly, I was really disappointed.

I had no emotional attachment to the characters so when anything happened to them I didn’t care, I could barely focus through the movie and I had nothing distracting me so I have nothing but the movie to blame it on.

I’ve never been a huge Scarlett Johansson fan, I think the gross obsession some people have with her on the internet has affected my view of her, and I thought that she came off as incredibly detached and even more robotic than she should have been. I get it, she’s got the body of a machine and the brain of a human, but she seemed more machine than human and I didn’t really see any kind of journey toward her humanity. I also couldn’t understand why her team loved her so much, I saw no reason for the emotional attachment considering how aloof she was toward everyone.

Enough of the source material shown through that I would be interested in picking it up, but I was not a fan of this movie.

2/5

Westworld (2016-?)

Westworld (2016-?)

Network:

HBO

Starring:

Anthony Hopkins

Evan Rachel Wood

Jeffery Wright

Ed Harris

Thandie Newton

Plot:

Set at the intersection of the near future and the reimagined past, explore a world in which every human appetite, no matter how noble or depraved, can be indulged without consequence.

Review:

I remember the first time I watched the Westworld movie. I was at my grandmother’s house looking through her boyfriends VHS tapes and I saw one with Westworld written on it. I liked westerns so I figured, sure why not. Holy shit, it was nothing like what I expected and it was awesome.

I think I’ve maybe watched the movie two times, but it has stuck with me and when I found out that HBO was doing a TV show I was excited. The longer it took to come out the more concerned I was, until I just tried to forget about it. However, since we decided to try out HBO I couldn’t not at least watch the first episode, right? So glad I did.

It took me longer than it probably should have to finish the season, but it’s not a show I can watch with my daughter around. It ended up being one of the few shows out there that I didn’t end up using my phone through, I loved it. It wasn’t like anything I expected, but I think I’m alright with that, though I do hope we see more of the other worlds at some point.

Anthony Hopkins character, Ford, always had me guessing whether he was good or bad, still not sure. Deloris, Evan Rachel Wood, was so innocent appearing and watching her realize what was happening to her was entertaining. Maeve, Thandie Newton, was a bit violent and unfeeling for my liking, but considering what she’d been put through it was understandable.

It wouldn’t be an HBO show without gratuitous sex scenes and even though I’m far from a prude I find them difficult to watch. Thankfully, the season wasn’t full of them so I only had about one an episode I had to look away through.

I only saw a couple of the revelations coming at the end and because of that really enjoyed it. I liked that last episode a lot and I can’t wait to see the next season, I’ll probably make sure we have HBO at the time so I can watch as it airs.

4.5/5

The Atlantis Plague (The Origin Mystery #2) By: A.G. Riddle

The Atlantis Plague (The Origin Mystery #2) By: A.G. Riddle

Plot:

In Marbella, Spain, Dr. Kate Warner awakens to a horrifying reality: the human race stands on the brink of extinction. A pandemic unlike any before it has swept the globe. Nearly a billion people are dead–and those the Atlantis Plague doesn’t kill, it transforms at the genetic level. A few rapidly evolve. The remainder devolve. As the world slips into chaos, radical solutions emerge. Industrialized nations offer a miracle drug, Orchid, which they mass produce and distribute to refugee camps around the world. But Orchid is merely a way to buy time. It treats the symptoms of the plague but never cures the disease. Immari International offers a different approach: do nothing. Let the plague run its course. The Immari envision a world populated by the genetically superior survivors–a new human race, ready to fulfill its destiny. With control of the world population hanging in the balance, the Orchid Alliance and the Immari descend into open warfare. Now humanity’s last hope is to find a cure, and Kate alone holds the key to unraveling the mystery surrounding the Atlantis Plague. The answer may lie in understanding pivotal events in human history–events when the human genome mysteriously changed. Kate’s journey takes her across the barren wastelands of Europe and northern Africa, but it’s her research into the past that takes her where she never expected to go. She soon discovers that the history of human evolution is not what it seems–and setting it right may require a sacrifice she never imagined.

Review:

Ugh, I did not like this book. I ended up skipping a lot because it just got so boring. There was too much “science” and even lots of history thrown in. I like science and history, but there was just way too much for this to be fun.

The bad guy is still pretty over the top evil. Last time he would occasionally out of the blue have sex and there was more of that in this one. It doesn’t really make sense, to me, it’s just out of nowhere. I don’t know what it’s supposed to make me think of the character cause it’s kind of just random.

Two protagonists are fairly boring. Really dislike the female lead because she’s just sort of there when action happens. I don’t need her to kick butt, but she feels like a door mat. On the other side is the male lead who is all kick butt, bossy, alpha male. He’s also, apparently a history buff.

You found out more about the Atlanteans but it was sprinkled throughout and came about in a roundabout weird way.

Honestly, I just really did not like this book and won’t be reading the next. I don’t even care that I missing out on the rest of the story.

2/5

The Atlantis Gene (The Origin Myster #1) By: A.G. Riddle

The Atlantis Gene (The Origin Mystery #1) By: A.G. Riddle

Plot:

The Immari are good at keeping secrets. For 2,000 years, they have hidden the truth about human evolution. And they’ve searched for an ancient enemy — a threat that could wipe out the human race. Now the search is over. Off the coast of Antarctica, a research vessel has discovered a mysterious structure buried deep in an iceberg. It’s been there for thousands of years, and it isn’t man made. The Immari think they know what it is, but they aren’t taking any chances. The time has come to execute their master plan: humanity must evolve or perish. In a lab in Indonesia, a brilliant geneticist may have just discovered the key to their plan. Four years ago, Dr. Kate Warner left California for Jakarta, Indonesia to escape her past. She hasn’t recovered from what happened to her, but she has made an incredible discovery: a cure for autism. Or so she thinks. What she’s found is actually far more dangerous. Her research could rewrite human history and unleash the next stage of human evolution. In the hands of the Immari, it would mean the end of humanity as we know it. One man has seen pieces of the Immari conspiracy: Agent David Vale. But he’s out of time to stop it. His informant is dead. His organization has been infiltrated. His enemy is hunting him. But when he receives a cryptic code from an anonymous source, he risks everything to save the only person that can solve it: Dr. Kate Warner. Now Kate and David must race to unravel a global conspiracy and learn the truth about the Atlantis Gene… and human origins. Their journey takes them to the far corners of the globe and into the secrets of their pasts. The Immari are close on their heels and will stop at nothing to find the Atlantis Gene and force the next stage of human evolution — even if it means killing 99.9% of the world’s population. David and Kate can stop them… if they can trust each other. And stay alive.

Review:

I downloaded this book not so much because I was interested in the story, I mean it sounds interesting, but only about 70% so(using Netflix new, stupid thumbs up ratings thingie), I downloaded the book because I was searching for a sci-fi book that painted a positive light of the future and this was on every Amazon Sci-Fi best seller list there was. Apparently it’s got everything, except a positive outlook on the future. Oddly enough, I was 70% into the story before I started to like it. It took me two weeks to get there, but when I finally did I finished the story fast.

It’s borderline too hard sci-fi for me. There’s a lot of talk about genetics and evolution and I understand the basics so I wasn’t lost, but sometimes it got tedious. It also jumped around between a lot of people in the beginning and between time periods, around the 70% mark is actually where things settled down and it focused on just three people.

There was a ton of world building and by the end you basically know the last one hundred years of two families histories, which was a bit much for me. It was not what I would call action packed, even though a lot of people were killed with guns.

Honestly, if the last 30% wasn’t so interesting I wouldn’t bother with the next, as is I’m actually not looking forward to it as much as I would normally, but I do still want to read it, mainly because I want to see why so many people like it so much.

3/5

The Rosetta Man By: Claire McCague

The Rosetta Man By: Claire McCague

Plot:

Wanted: Translator for first contact. Immediate opening. Danger pay allowance

Estlin Hume lives in Twin Butte, Alberta surrounded by a horde of affectionate squirrels. His involuntary squirrel-attracting talent leaves him evicted, expelled, fired and near penniless until two aliens arrive and adopt him as their translator. Yanked around the world at the center of the first contact crisis, Estlin finds his new employers incomprehensible. As he faces the ultimate language barrier, unsympathetic military forces converging in the South Pacific keep threatening to shoot the messenger. The question on everyone’s mind is why are the aliens here? But Estlin’s starting to think we’ll happily blow ourselves up in the process of finding that out.


Review:

So recently I was looking at the Amazon Sci-Fi best seller list trying to find a new Sci-Fi book that actually paints the future in a bright light. I downloaded a few samples and this was one of them.

Holy cow I was not expecting this to grab me like it did. I hadn’t even finished the sample when I decided I would pay whatever the author was asking for to read the rest of the story. Thankfully, she didn’t want much, but I would have paid it. This story grabbed me and didn’t let go, rarely does this happen and I was not expecting it. I’m not sure if it was the fact that I’ve never read a first contact novel or that the story was just that compelling but since the author doesn’t seem to have written anything else I’ll have to find another first contact that doesn’t involve aliens killing us to try and judge.

The characters were interesting and the way events unfolded seemed very realistic. I loved the fact that it started in New Zealand and the setting wasn’t the normal US centric, though, it does say a lot about my country that I didn’t doubt the stupid stuff they did or how hostel they could be. The author was pretty generous and didn’t make them horrible so that was nice.

Loved this book but if I had one complaint it would be the ending. There was still so much unresolved, though, it wasn’t out of nowhere. I just wish there was more of an ending. I look forward to whatever else the author writes.

4.5/5