Forest Whitaker

Bloodsport (1988)

The Great Movie Re-Watch

Bloodsport (1988)

Director:

Newt Arnold

Writers:

Sheldon Lettich

Christopher Crosby

Mel Friedman

Starring:

Jean-Claude Van Damme

Donald Gibb

Leah Aryes

Norman Burton

Forest Whitaker

Blurb:

“Bloodsport” follows Frank Dux, an American martial artist serving in the military, who decides to leave the army to compete in a martial arts tournament in Hong Kong where fights to the death can occur.

Thoughts:

I’ve been stuck on Bloodsport for a while because it’s another one of my husband’s movies, and he can’t watch movies as frequently as I do. He prefers to play video games. Eventually, I got tired of waiting and put it on while he played Monster Hunter on the switch, occasionally looking up. I realize, technically, I could skip these kinds of movies. It’s not mine, after all. It feels like cheating, though. I don’t hate Bloodsport. I don’t feel a need to own it, but I don’t have an issue watching it. So I force myself to all in the name of sticking to my Great Movie Re-Watch plan.

Bloodsport is one of Jean-Claude Van Damme’s first big movies. Despite the lack of plot and inclusion of most action movie cliché’s it was incredibly popular and made a decent amount of money. Enough to spawn a couple of sequels, at least. The fight scenes are fun, but the acting is pretty bad, and the story is often unintentionally hilarious. There is also a cat that meows throughout all of the fight scenes. It’s distracting and annoying.

One of the best things to come out of Bloodsport is a Mentos spoof commercial that I will link to below. It’s another entertainingly bad action movie.

Good Morning, Vietnam (1987)

Good Morning Vietnam

Good Morning, Vietnam (1987)

Director:

Barry Levinson

Starring:

Robin Williams

Forest Whitaker

Tung Thanh Tran

Plot:

An unorthodox and irreverent DJ begins to shake up things when he is assigned to the US Armed Services Radio station in Vietnam.

Review:

I’ve known about this movie, of course, and seen parts on television, but it wasn’t until Netflix added it that I was finally able to watch.

The Vietnam war is such a tragic part of history, both what happened during and after. I thought this movie did a great job showing that tragedy and Robin Williams portrayal was perfect.

I did think the parts with his “romance” were a little weird, but it’s probably just me. I knew when the kid got him out of the cantina that something was going to happen, but I still couldn’t help but feel Williams’ shock at seeing first hand the horror of war.

This was the first Williams film I’ve watch since his passing and it made the movie that much sadder. I couldn’t see him without feeling his loss.

4.5/5

Lee Daniels’ The Butler (2013)

the butler

Director:

Lee Daniels

Starring:

Forest Whitaker

Oprah Winfrey

Plot:

As Cecil Gaines serves eight presidents during his tenure as a butler at the White House, the civil rights movement, Vietnam, and other major events affect this man’s life, family, and American society.

Review:

First off, who names a film and puts their own name in the title?

This was a feel good movie that had me crying through the last third of it. He just wanted to support his family? Why couldn’t his son see that? Why couldn’t he see that his son had grown up and changed? So much bitterness, but it all turned out good in the end.

4/5