YA

Renegades

Renegades (Renegades #1) By: Marissa Meyer

Plot:

Secret Identities. Extraordinary Powers. She wants vengeance. He wants justice.

The Renegades are a syndicate of prodigies — humans with extraordinary abilities — who emerged from the ruins of a crumbled society and established peace and order where chaos reigned. As champions of justice, they remain a symbol of hope and courage to everyone… except the villains they once overthrew.

Nova has a reason to hate the Renegades, and she is on a mission for vengeance. As she gets closer to her target, she meets Adrian, a Renegade boy who believes in justice — and in Nova. But Nova’s allegiance is to a villain who has the power to end them both.

Review:

Why do YA superhero books have to start out killing a baby? I understand setting up a tragic past, but come on do something else, please.

It took me a while to get into Renegades, partly, I believe, because it reminded me a lot of Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson. As the world was revealed and the characters more developed those similarities lessened, but it was still a world recovering from an apocalypse, still had young adults with powers making stupid decisions and being emo.

Nova and Adrian are frustrating characters for me, they’re both smart kids, capable of critical thinking, but they have both swallowed the kool-aid so completely on their respective sides that they can’t seem to see the negatives. They’d walk right up to the edge and then turn around, they couldn’t take that final step. It was annoying.

My fear is that the next book, which is supposed to be the final one, doesn’t try to fix things, that it picks a side and you’re supposed to just accept the problems that come with it. Surely that’s not where she’s going with this.

I was disappointed with the level of world building. What there was only really existed for the Renegades. The rest of the world didn’t matter, it was just sort of there ignored in the background.

There was some potential here, but I wasn’t thrilled with really anything in this book.

3/5

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All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook By: Leslie Connor

All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook By: Leslie Connor

Plot:

From Leslie Connor, award-winning author of Waiting for Normal and Crunch, comes a soaring and heartfelt story about love, forgiveness, and how innocence makes us all rise up. All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook is a powerful story, perfect for fans of Wonder and When You Reach Me.

Eleven-year-old Perry was born and raised by his mom at the Blue River Co-ed Correctional Facility in tiny Surprise, Nebraska. His mom is a resident on Cell Block C, and so far Warden Daugherty has made it possible for them to be together. That is, until a new district attorney discovers the truth—and Perry is removed from the facility and forced into a foster home.

When Perry moves to the “outside” world, he feels trapped. Desperate to be reunited with his mom, Perry goes on a quest for answers about her past crime. As he gets closer to the truth, he will discover that love makes people resilient no matter where they come from . . . but can he find a way to tell everyone what home truly means?

Review:

I cried through this entire story, there are so many tear stains on the pages of this library book. I expected it to be well written based on the buzz around it, but I had no idea that I would end up crying so much. After the first chapter I knew that it was going to be an emotional journey so I had to read the last chapter to make sure there was a happy ending.

***SPOILERS***

There was.

Perry was so innocent and optimistic and just let things roll right over him that would normally drive an adult crazy. His ability to cope with things was remarkable and I wish I had his skills. Just when I was starting to think he was too good, though, Connor allowed him to get mad. He had been bothered by things throughout the book, but he was able to accept that there was nothing that he could do about them.

I do wish that he had a bit more fight in him, but the book acknowledged that was an area he could grow in. I also wish that the pay off at the end was a bit better. I found myself reacting like one of the characters and I wished things had been fair. I at least wanted the DA to have more negative backlash against him. It would have also been nice to learn more about Perry’s father.

There was so much love between the characters. It was beautiful.

4/5

A Thousand Pieces of You (Firebird #1) By: Claudia Gray

 

A Thousand Pieces of You (Firebird #1) By: Claudia Gray

Plot:

Cloud Atlas meets Orphan Black in this epic dimension-bending trilogy by New York Times bestselling author Claudia Gray about a girl who must chase her father’s killer through multiple dimensions.

Marguerite Caine’s physicist parents are known for their groundbreaking achievements. Their most astonishing invention, called the Firebird, allows users to jump into multiple universes—and promises to revolutionize science forever. But then Marguerite’s father is murdered, and the killer—her parent’s handsome, enigmatic assistant Paul— escapes into another dimension before the law can touch him.

Marguerite refuses to let the man who destroyed her family go free. So she races after Paul through different universes, always leaping into another version of herself. But she also meets alternate versions of the people she knows—including Paul, whose life entangles with hers in increasingly familiar ways. Before long she begins to question Paul’s guilt—as well as her own heart. And soon she discovers the truth behind her father’s death is far more sinister than she expected.

A Thousand Pieces of You explores an amazingly intricate multi-universe where fate is unavoidable, the truth elusive, and love the greatest mystery of all.

Review:

Lost Stars was an incredible book, because of that I needed to try something else by Claudia Gray. A Thousand Pieces of You is about parallel universe and traveling to them, if that isn’t right up my alley I don’t know what is.

A Thousand Pieces of You is about traveling between universes, it’s got a system all worked out, it does it multiple times, but that isn’t the main point of the book. The main story is a freaking love triangle! Ugh. Other people might not feel that way, the characters certainly wouldn’t, it’s not about who she loves that way it’s about finding who killed her father and what the hell is going on, but there was just too much relationship stuff for me to agree. Her struggle between the two was in every chapter and it annoyed me to no end.

The book was well written the world’s created were cool and well thought out, but I just couldn’t stand the main character. She was stupid, it was clear from the first chapter that something was wrong with her motivation and she didn’t question it, she just pushed on and it bugged me. I just kept wanting to get to the part where she was as smart as people kept saying and I had to wait until the end of the book.

If it wasn’t for those two things I’d read the next book, but I just can’t handle more of the relationship drama. She’s basically made her choice at this point, but I know it’s not going to be that simple, it can’t be in these types of books. Technically I believe this book was actually a New Adult instead of a YA, the heroine was a senior in high school but she had sex, so *shrug*

If you don’t mind any of the things I mentioned I recommend reading this, it has a nice fleshed out plot and I’m sure it will continue to be, but I just can’t go on and that makes me sad. I was really hoping that Claudia Gray would end up being another favorite author.

3/5

Timebound (The Chronos Files #1) By: Rysa Walker

timebound

Timebound (The Chronos Files #1) By: Rysa Walker

Plot:

When Kate Pierce-Keller’s grandmother gives her a strange blue medallion and speaks of time travel, sixteen-year-old Kate assumes the old woman is delusional. But it all becomes horrifyingly real when a murder in the past destroys the foundation of Kate’s present-day life. Suddenly, that medallion is the only thing protecting Kate from blinking out of existence.

Kate learns that the 1893 killing is part of something much more sinister, and Kate’s genetic ability to time-travel makes her the only one who can stop him. Risking everything, she travels to the Chicago World’s Fair to try to prevent the killing and the chain of events that follows.

Changing the timeline comes with a personal cost, however—if Kate succeeds, the boy she loves will have no memory of her existence. And regardless of her motives, does she have the right to manipulate the fate of the entire world?

Review:

I almost forgot to write this review. I actually had the title of the book wrong in my mind as well. Neither of those things are glowing indorsements, but I didn’t hate the book. I didn’t even dislike it, it just wasn’t my thing.

Timebound is a YA book, I know, I know, I need to stop doing this to myself, but the plot sounded interesting and I love time travel. Except, this book only had time travel until the very end and when they talked about time travel before that it got confusing and convoluted in places.

Most of the book was teen angst and stupid hormonal teenage decisions, which is not something I enjoy reading as a thirty year old woman. Honestly, it’s not something I would have enjoyed reading as a teenager either, but I was/am weird.

There was the makings of a love triangle, which I dislike. There was a weird family dynamic, but not in a kooky sort of way, in a why can’t these people just sit down and talk to each other and clear this shit up sort of way.

The thing I liked the best in the book was the way the villain is going about trying to take over the world. The villain himself isn’t very remarkable and it isn’t clear yet if he’s the main villain or if someone is pulling his strings, but that doesn’t really matter. His chosen world domination method is intriguing and made me think and I really wished there’d been more put into it. It didn’t even come to light until about the halfway point I think.

***SPOILERS***

The villain is using time travelers to go back in time and create a religion with him at the center. He’s using the tech to make people think he’s a god so that he gains more and more power in the future he’s in. It’s super interesting and if anyone knows of another book with that I’d be interested in hearing about it.

***END OF SPOILERS***

Even though I didn’t dislike the book there are just too many negatives for me to push forward in this series.

3/5

A Study in Charlotte (Charlotte Holmes #1) By: Brittany Cavallaro

A Study in Charlotte (Charlotte Holmes #1) By: Brittany Cavallaro

Plot:

The last thing Jamie Watson wants is a rugby scholarship to Sherringford, a Connecticut prep school just an hour away from his estranged father. But that’s not the only complication: Sherringford is also home to Charlotte Holmes, the famous detective’s great-great-great-granddaughter, who has inherited not only Sherlock’s genius but also his volatile temperament. From everything Jamie has heard about Charlotte, it seems safer to admire her from afar.

From the moment they meet, there’s a tense energy between them, and they seem more destined to be rivals than anything else. But when a Sherringford student dies under suspicious circumstances, ripped straight from the most terrifying of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Jamie can no longer afford to keep his distance. Jamie and Charlotte are being framed for murder, and only Charlotte can clear their names. But danger is mounting and nowhere is safe—and the only people they can trust are each other.

A Study in Charlotte is the first in a trilogy.

Review:

The Lois Lane YA series lulled me into a false sense of security and I thought that I’d try another couple of YA books, wrong decision. A Study in Charlotte was what I dislike most about YA books, teen angst. Added to that was pretty much every negative character trait that Sherlock Holmes has all shoved into a teenage girl that had already been given every negative trait of a teenage girl. It was not appealing.

Watson could have made things at least a little better, but he didn’t. He spent the entire book creepily crushing on Holmes, which is a feat since there isn’t much of an age difference but the way it was all written just felt disturbing.

I thought the concept of this book was interesting, but it was a miracle I finished it. I don’t loathe it, but it is not something I would recommend.

2/5